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Applies to SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11 SP4

11 Accessing the Internet

If you have chosen not to configure Internet access during the installation, you can perform this task at any time using YaST. How to configure your computer to access the Internet depends on your environment. If the computer you are installing is part of a network which already is connected to the Internet, the only thing to do is to link your machine to the network. If you are installing a machine that is directly connected to the Internet, the hardware and the access to the Internet Service Provider (ISP) needs to be set up.

Please refer to the checklists below to make sure you have all the necessary data ready before starting to configure the Internet access.

11.1 Direct Internet Connection

When your computer is directly connected to the Internet, you first need to configure the hardware that is used for this task. This can either be an internal device (such as an ISDN card) or an external device (for example, a modem). In most cases it is detected automatically.

Next, you need to enter the data provided by your ISP (such as login credentials, gateway, or name server, for example). You should have received a data sheet from your ISP where all the necessary data is listed.

If you have successfully configured your hardware and ISP data, use the NetworkManager for managing the internet connection. See Chapter 27, Using NetworkManager for details.

11.1.1 Checklist DSL

There are different types of DSL devices available that use different point-to-point protocol (PPP) methods:

  • a regular ethernet card connected to the external DSL modem uses PPP over Ethernet (PPPoE). In Austria the Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) is used. With PPTP the external modem also has a static IP address.

  • an internal DSL modem uses PPP over ATM (PPPoATM)

  • an internal ADSL Fritz Card uses CAPI for ADSL

The DSL configuration module already contains the data for major ISPs in some countries. If your ISP is not listed, you will need to know how name resolving (DNS) and IP allocation is handled (in most cases this data is received automatically when connecting). Regardless whether you choose an ISP from the list or add a custom provider, you need to enter at least your login and password.

For configuration details, refer to Section 22.4.5, “DSL”.

11.1.2 Checklist ISDN

In case your internal ISDN card is not detected automatically you will need to know the vendor and the name of the device.

Note
Note: ISDN Modem or Terminal Adapter

If you are using an external ISDN modem or terminal adapter, refer to Section 11.1.3, “Checklist Modem” instead.

In order to configure the ISDN device you will need the following data:

  • ISDN Protocol (depends on your country)

  • Area code and phone number.

  • Interface type (SyncPPP or RawIP). If unsure, select SyncPPP, because RawIP is only used in connection with certain telephone systems.

  • Local and remote IP addresses for the dial-in server and the gateway, in the case that you were given a static IP address from your provider.

  • The ISDN configuration module already contains the data for major ISPs in some countries. If your ISP is not listed, you will need to know how name resolving (DNS) and IP allocation is handled (in most cases this data is received automatically when connecting). Regardless whether you chose an ISP from the list or added a custom provider, you need to enter at least your login and password.

For configuration details, refer to Section 22.4.3, “ISDN”.

11.1.3 Checklist Modem

If your modem is not detected automatically, you will need to know whether it is connected to a serial port or to a USB port. Please note that not all USB modems and internal modems are supported by SUSE® Linux Enterprise Server.

The modem configuration module already contains the data for major ISPs in some countries. If your ISP is not listed, you will need to know its dial-in number and how name resolving (DNS) and IP allocation is handled (in most cases this data is received automatically when connecting). Regardless whether you chose an ISP from the list or added a custom provider, you need to enter at least your login and password.

For configuration details, refer to Section 22.4.2, “Modem”.

11.1.4 Checklist Cable Modem

Accessing the Internet through the TV cable requires a cable modem. Such a modem is connected to the computer via ethernet cable. Therefore it is only necessary to configure your network card accordingly. For details, refer to Section 22.4.4, “Cable Modem”.

11.2 Internet Connection Via Network

If your machine is part of a network which is already connected to the Internet, it is very easy to gain Internet access (just configure your network card and connect your machine to the existing network and you are done). This not only applies to large company networks, but to small home networks as well. Even if the machine you are installing is only connected to a router (e.g. a DSL router) it is already part of a network. It is irrelevant whether you are using a wireless network adapter or a wired one.

Note
Note: Routing and Name Services

In the following it is assumed that the network is connected to the Internet and provides routing and name services. In case these services are provided by a router, make sure the router is configured correctly before setting up the client.

11.2.1 Checklist Network

If your network provides DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) check the appropriate check box when setting up the network card and you are done (all parameters needed will be provided by the DHCP server).

If DHCP is not available, ask your network administrator for the following details:

  • Hostname

  • Name server

  • Gateway

For configuration details for wired network cards, refer to Section 22.4.1, “Configuring the Network Card with YaST”, for wireless network cards see Section 19.5, “Configuration with YaST”.

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