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Applies to SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11 SP4

Part IV Services

22 Basic Networking

Linux offers the necessary networking tools and features for integration into all types of network structures. Network access using a network card, modem or other device can be configured with YaST. Manual configuration is also possible. In this chapter only the fundamental mechanisms and the relevant network configuration files are covered.

23 SLP Services in the Network

The service location protocol (SLP) was developed to simplify the configuration of networked clients within a local network. To configure a network client, including all required services, the administrator traditionally needs detailed knowledge of the servers available in the network. SLP makes the availability of selected services known to all clients in the local network. Applications that support SLP can use the information distributed and be configured automatically.

24 Time Synchronization with NTP

The NTP (network time protocol) mechanism is a protocol for synchronizing the system time over the network. First, a machine can obtain the time from a server that is a reliable time source. Second, a machine can itself act as a time source for other computers in the network. The goal is twofold—maintaining the absolute time and synchronizing the system time of all machines within a network.

25 The Domain Name System

DNS (domain name system) is needed to resolve the domain names and hostnames into IP addresses. In this way, the IP address 192.168.2.100 is assigned to the hostname jupiter, for example. Before setting up your own name server, read the general information about DNS in Section 22.3, “Name Resolution”. The following configuration examples refer to BIND.

26 DHCP

The purpose of the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) is to assign network settings centrally (from a server) rather than configuring them locally on each and every workstation. A host configured to use DHCP does not have control over its own static address. It is enabled to configure itself completely and automatically according to directions from the server. If you use the NetworkManager on the client side, you do not need to configure the client at all. This is useful if you have changing environments and only one interface active at a time. Never use NetworkManager on a machine that runs a DHCP server.

27 Using NetworkManager

NetworkManager is the ideal solution for laptops and other portable computers. It supports state-of-the-art encryption types and standards for network connections, including connections to 802.1X protected networks. 802.1X is the “IEEE Standard for Local and Metropolitan Area Networks—Port-Based Net…

28 Samba

Using Samba, a Unix machine can be configured as a file and print server for Mac OS X, Windows, and OS/2 machines. Samba has developed into a fully-fledged and rather complex product. Configure Samba with YaST, SWAT (a Web interface), or by editing the configuration file manually.

29 Sharing File Systems with NFS

Distributing and sharing file systems over a network is a common task in corporate environments. The well-proven network file system (NFS) works together with NIS, the yellow pages protocol. For a more secure protocol that works together with LDAP and may also use Kerberos, check NFSv4. Combined with pNFS, you can eliminate performance bottlenecks.

NFS with NIS makes a network transparent to the user. With NFS, it is possible to distribute arbitrary file systems over the network. With an appropriate setup, users always find themselves in the same environment regardless of the terminal they currently use.

30 File Synchronization

These days, many people use several computers—one computer at home, one or several computers at the workplace, and possibly a laptop, tablet, or a smartphone on the road. Many files are needed on all these computers. You may want to be able to work with all computers and modify the files so that you have the latest version of the data available on all computers.

31 The Apache HTTP Server

With a share of more than 50%, the Apache HTTP Server (Apache) is the world's most widely-used Web server according to the Survey from http://www.netcraft.com/. Apache, developed by the Apache Software Foundation (http://www.apache.org/), is available for most operating systems. SUSE® Linux Enterprise Server includes Apache version 2.2. In this chapter, learn how to install, configure and set up a Web server; how to use SSL, CGI, and additional modules; and how to troubleshoot Apache.

32 Setting up an FTP Server with YaST

Using the YaST FTP Server module, you can configure your machine to function as an FTP (File Transfer Protocol) server. Anonymous and/or authenticated users can connect to your machine and download files using the FTP protocol. Depending on the configuration, they can also upload files to the FTP server. YaST provides a unified configuration interface for various FTP server daemons installed on your system.

33 The Squid Proxy Server

Squid is a widely-used proxy cache for Linux and UNIX platforms. This means that it stores requested Internet objects, such as data on a Web or FTP server, on a machine that is closer to the requesting workstation than the server. It may be set up in multiple hierarchies to assure optimal response times and low bandwidth usage, even in modes that are transparent for the end user. Additional software like squidGuard may be used to filter Web contents.

34 Web Based Enterprise Management Using SFCB

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