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Applies to SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11 SP4

Part II System

9 32-Bit and 64-Bit Applications in a 64-Bit System Environment

SUSE® Linux Enterprise Server is available for several 64-bit platforms. This does not necessarily mean that all the applications included have already been ported to 64-bit platforms. SUSE Linux Enterprise Server supports the use of 32-bit applications in a 64-bit system environment. This chapter o…

10 Booting and Configuring a Linux System

Booting a Linux system involves different components. The hardware itself is initialized by the BIOS, which starts the Kernel by means of a boot loader. After this point, the boot process with init and the runlevels is completely controlled by the operating system. The runlevel concept enables you to maintain setups for everyday usage as well as to perform maintenance tasks on the system.

11 The Boot Loader GRUB

This chapter describes how to configure GRUB (Grand Unified Bootloader), the boot loader used in SUSE® Linux Enterprise Server. A special YaST module is available for configuring all settings. If you are not familiar with the subject of booting in Linux, read the following sections to acquire some background information. This chapter also describes some of the problems frequently encountered when booting with GRUB and their solutions.

12 UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface)

UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface) is the interface between the firmware that comes with the system hardware, all the hardware components of the system, and the operating system.

13 Special System Features

This chapter starts with information about various software packages, the virtual consoles and the keyboard layout. We talk about software components like bash, cron and logrotate, because they were changed or enhanced during the last release cycles. Even if they are small or considered of minor importance, users may want to change their default behavior, because these components are often closely coupled with the system. The chapter concludes with a section about language and country-specific settings (I18N and L10N).

14 Printer Operation

SUSE® Linux Enterprise Server supports printing with many types of printers, including remote network printers. Printers can be configured manually or with YaST. For configuration instructions, refer to Section 8.5, “Setting Up a Printer”. Both graphical and command line utilities are available for …

15 Dynamic Kernel Device Management with udev

The kernel can add or remove almost any device in a running system. Changes in the device state (whether a device is plugged in or removed) need to be propagated to userspace. Devices need to be configured as soon as they are plugged in and recognized. Users of a certain device need to be informed a…

16 The X Window System

The X Window System (X11) is the de facto standard for graphical user interfaces in UNIX. X is network-based, enabling applications started on one host to be displayed on another host connected over any kind of network (LAN or Internet). This chapter describes the setup and optimization of the X Win…

17 Accessing File Systems with FUSE

FUSE is the acronym for file system in userspace. This means you can configure and mount a file system as an unprivileged user. Normally, you have to be root for this task. FUSE alone is a kernel module. Combined with plug-ins, it allows you to extend FUSE to access almost all file systems like remote SSH connections, ISO images, and more.