Jump to contentJump to page navigation: previous page [access key p]/next page [access key n]
Applies to SUSE OpenStack Cloud 8

1 Using the Operations Console Edit source

1.1 Operations Console Overview Edit source

Often referred to as the Ops Console, you can use this web-based graphical user interface (GUI) to view data about your cloud infrastructure and ensure your cloud is operating correctly.

You can use the Operations Console for SUSE OpenStack Cloud 8 to view data about your SUSE OpenStack Cloud infrastructure in a web-based graphical user interface (GUI) and ensure your cloud is operating correctly. By logging on to the console, SUSE OpenStack Cloud administrators can manage data in the following ways: Triage alarm notifications.

  • Alarm Definitions and notifications now have their own screens and are collected under the Alarm Explorer menu item which can be accessed from the Central Dashboard. Central Dashboard now allows you to customize the view in the following ways:

    • Rename or re-configure existing alarm cards to include services different from the defaults

    • Create a new alarm card with the services you want to select

    • Reorder alarm cards using drag and drop

    • View all alarms that have no service dimension now grouped in an Uncategorized Alarms card

    • View all alarms that have a service dimension that does not match any of the other cards -now grouped in an Other Alarms card

  • You can also easily access alarm data for a specific component. On the Summary page for the following components, a link is provided to an alarms screen specifically for that component:

1.1.1 Monitor the environment by giving priority to alarms that take precedence. Edit source

Alarm Explorer now allows you to manage alarms in the following ways:

  • Refine the monitoring environment by creating new alarms to specify a combination of metrics, services, and hosts that match the triggers unique to an environment

  • Filter alarms in one place using an enumerated filter box instead of service badges

  • Specify full alarm IDs as dimension key-value pairs in the form of dimension=value

1.1.2 Support Changes Edit source

  • To resolve scalability issues, plain text search through alarm sets is no longer supported

The Business Logic Layer of Operations Console is a middleware component that serves as a single point of contact for the user interface to communicate with OpenStack services such as Monasca, Nova, and others.

1.2 Connecting to the Operations Console Edit source

Instructions for accessing the Operations Console through a web browser.

To connect to Operations Console, perform the following:

Operations Console will always be accessed over port 9095.

1.2.1 Required Access Credentials Edit source

In previous versions of Operations Console you were required to have only the password for the Administrator account (admin by default). Now the Administrator user account must also have all of the following credentials:

ProjectDomainRoleDescription
*All projects**not specific*AdminAdmin role on at least one project
*All projects**not specific*AdminAdmin role in default domain
AdmindefaultAdmin or Monasca-userAdmin or Monasca-user role on admin project
Important
Important

If your login account has administrator role on the administrator project, then you only need to make sure you have the administrator role on the default domain.

Administrator account

During installation, an administrator account called admin is created by default.

Administrator password

During installation, an administrator password is randomly created by default. It is not recommend that you change the default password.

To find the randomized password:

  1. To display the password, log on to the Cloud Lifecycle Manager and run:

    cat ~/service.osrc

1.2.2 Connect Through a Browser Edit source

The following instructions will show you how to find the URL to access Operations Console. You will use SSH, also known as Secure Socket Shell, which provides administrators with a secure way to access a remote computer.

To access Operations Console:

  1. Log in to the Cloud Lifecycle Manager.

  2. Locate the URL or IP address for the Operations Console with the following command:

    source ~/service.osrc && openstack endpoint list | grep opsconsole | grep admin

    Sample output:

    | 8ef10dd9c00e4abdb18b5b22adc93e87 | region1 | opsconsole | opsconsole | True | admin | https://192.168.24.169:9095/api/v1/

    To access Operations Console, in the sample output, remove everything after port 9095 (api/v1/) and in a browser, type:

    https://192.168.24.169:9095

1.2.3 Optionally use a Hostname OR virtual IP address to access Operations Console Edit source

Important
Important

If you can access Operations Console using the above instructions, then you can skip this section. These steps provide an alternate way to access Operations Console if the above steps do not work for you.

To find your hostname OR IP address:

  1. Navigate to and open in a text editor the following file:

    network_groups.yml
  2. Find the following entry:

    external-name
  3. If your administrator set a hostname value in the external-name field, you will use that hostname when logging in to Operations Console. or example, in a browser you would type:

    https://VIP:9095
  4. If your administrator did not set a hostname value, then to determine the IP address to use, from your Cloud Lifecycle Manager, run:

    grep HZN-WEB /etc/hosts

    The output of that command will show you the virtual IP address you should use. For example, in a browser you would type:

    https://VIP:9095

1.3 Managing Compute Hosts Edit source

Operations Console (Ops Console) provides a graphical interface for you to add and delete compute hosts.

As your deployment grows and changes, you may need to add more compute hosts to increase your capacity for VMs, or delete a host to reallocate hardware for a different use. To accomplish these tasks, in previous versions of SUSE OpenStack Cloud you had to use the command line to update configuration files and run ansible playbooks. Now Operations Console provides a graphical interface for you to complete the same tasks quickly using menu items in the console.

Important
Important

Do not refresh the Operations Console page or open Operations Console in another window during the following tasks. If you do, you will not see any notifications or be able to review the error log for more information. This would make troubleshooting difficult since you would not know the error that was encountered, or why it occurred.

Use Operations Console to perform the following tasks:

Important
Important

To use Operations Console, you need to have the correct permissions and know the URL or VIP connected to Operations Console during installation. For steps on how to complete these tasks, see Section 1.1, “Operations Console Overview”.

1.3.1 Create a Compute Host Edit source

If you need to create additional compute hosts for more virtual machine capacity, you can do this easily on the Compute Hosts screen.

To add a compute host:

  1. To open Operations Console, in a browser, enter either the URL or Virtual IP connected to Operations Console.

    For example:

    https://myardana.test:9095
    https://VIP:9095
  2. On the Home screen, click the menu represented by 3 horizontal lines (Three-Line Icon).

  3. From the menu that slides in on the left side, click Compute, and then Compute Hosts.

  4. On the Compute Hosts page, click Create Host.

  5. On the Add & Activate Compute Host tab that slides in from the right, enter the following information:

    Host ID

    Cloud Lifecycle Manager model's server ID

    Host Role

    Defined in the Cloud Lifecycle Manager model and cannot be modified in Operations Console

    Host Group

    Defined in the Cloud Lifecycle Manager model and cannot be modified in Operations Console

    Host NIC Mapping

    Defined in the Cloud Lifecycle Manager model and cannot be modified in Operations Console

    Encryption Key

    If the configuration is encrypted, enter the encryption key here

  6. Click Create Host, and in the confirmation screen that opens, click Confirm.

  7. Wait for SUSE OpenStack Cloud to complete the pre deployment steps. This process can take up to 2 minutes.

  8. If pre-deployment is successful, you will see a notification that deployment has started.

    Important
    Important

    If you receive a notice that pre-deployment did not complete successfully, read the notification explaining at which step the error occured. You can click on the error notification and see the ansible log for the configuration processor playbook. Then you can click Create Host in step 4 again and correct the mistake.

  9. Wait for SUSE OpenStack Cloud to complete the deployments steps. This process can take up to 20 minutes.

  10. If deployment is successful, you will see a notification and a new entry will appear in the compute hosts table.

    Important
    Important

    If you receive a notice that deployment did not complete successfully, read the notification explaining at which step the error occured. You can click on the error notification for more details.

1.3.2 Deactivate a Compute Host Edit source

If you have multiple compute hosts and for debugging reasons you want to disable them all except one, you may need to deactivate and then activate a compute host. If you want to delete a host, you will also have to deactivate it first. This can be done easily in the Operations Console.

Important
Important

The host must be in the following state: ACTIVATED

To deactivate a compute host:

  1. To open Operations Console, in a browser, enter either the URL or Virtual IP connected to Operations Console.

    For example:

    https://myardana.test:9095
    https://VIP:9095
  2. On the Home screen, click the menu represented by 3 horizontal lines (Three-Line Icon).

  3. From the menu that slides in on the left side, click Compute, and then Compute Hosts.

  4. On the Compute Hosts page, in the row for the host you want to deactivate, click the details button (Ellipsis Icon).

  5. Click Deactivate, and in the confirmation screen that opens, click Confirm.

  6. Wait for SUSE OpenStack Cloud to complete the operation. This process can take up to 2 minutes.

  7. If deactivation is successful, you will see a notification and in the compute hosts table the STATE will change to DEACTIVATED.

    Important
    Important

    If you receive a notice that the operation did not complete successfully, read the notification explaining at which step the error occured. You can click on the link in the error notification for more details. In the compute hosts table the STATE will remain ACTIVATED.

1.3.3 Activate a Compute Host Edit source

Important
Important

The host must be in the following state: DEACTIVATED

To activate a compute host:

  1. To open Operations Console, in a browser, enter either the URL or Virtual IP connected to Operations Console.

    For example:

    https://myardana.test:9095
    https://VIP:9095
  2. On the Home screen, click the menu represented by 3 horizontal lines (Three-Line Icon).

  3. From the menu that slides in on the left side, click Compute, and then Compute Hosts.

  4. On the Compute Hosts page, in the row for the host you want to activate, click the details button (Ellipsis Icon).

  5. Click Activate, and in the confirmation screen that opens, click Confirm.

  6. Wait for SUSE OpenStack Cloud to complete the operation. This process can take up to 2 minutes.

  7. If activation is successful, you will see a notification and in the compute hosts table the STATE will change to ACTIVATED.

    Important
    Important

    If you receive a notice that the operation did not complete successfully, read the notification explaining at which step the error occured. You can click on the link in the error notification for more details. In the compute hosts table the STATE will remain DEACTIVATED.

1.3.4 Delete a Compute Host Edit source

If you need to scale down the size of your current deployment to use the hardware for other purposes, you may want to delete a compute host.

Important
Important

Complete the following steps before deleting a host:

  • host must be in the following state: DEACTIVATED

  • Optionally you can migrate the instance off the host to be deleted. To do this, complete the following sections in Book “Operations Guide”, Chapter 13 “System Maintenance”, Section 13.1 “Planned System Maintenance”, Section 13.1.3 “Planned Compute Maintenance”, Section 13.1.3.5 “Removing a Compute Node”:

    1. Disable provisioning on the compute host.

    2. Use live migration to move any instances on this host to other hosts.

To delete a compute host:

  1. To open Operations Console, in a browser, enter either the URL or Virtual IP connected to Operations Console.

    For example:

    https://myardana.test:9095
    https://VIP:9095
  2. On the Home screen, click the menu represented by 3 horizontal lines (Three-Line Icon).

  3. From the menu that slides in on the left side, click Compute, and then Compute Hosts.

  4. On the Compute Hosts page, in the row for the host you want to delete, click the details button (Ellipsis Icon).

  5. Click Delete, and if the configuration is encrypted, enter the encryption key.

  6. in the confirmation screen that opens, click Confirm.

  7. In the compute hosts table you will see the STATE change to Deleting.

  8. Wait for SUSE OpenStack Cloud to complete the operation. This process can take up to 2 minutes.

  9. If deletion is successful, you will see a notification and in the compute hosts table the host will not be listed.

    Important
    Important

    If you receive a notice that the operation did not complete successfully, read the notification explaining at which step the error occured. You can click on the link in the error notification for more details. In the compute hosts table the STATE will remain DEACTIVATED.

1.3.5 For More Information Edit source

For more information on how to complete these tasks through the command line, see the following topics:

  • Book “Operations Guide”, Chapter 13 “System Maintenance”, Section 13.1 “Planned System Maintenance”, Section 13.1.3 “Planned Compute Maintenance”, Section 13.1.3.4 “Adding Compute Node”

  • Book “Operations Guide”, Chapter 13 “System Maintenance”, Section 13.1 “Planned System Maintenance”, Section 13.1.3 “Planned Compute Maintenance”, Section 13.1.3.5 “Removing a Compute Node”

1.4 Managing Swift Performance Edit source

In Operations Console you can monitor your Swift cluster to ensure long-term data protection as well as sufficient performance.

OpenStack Swift is an object storage solution with a focus on availability. While there are various mechanisms inside Swift to protect stored data and ensure a high availability, you must still closely monitor your Swift cluster to ensure long-term data protection as well as sufficient performance. The best way to manage Swift is to collect useful data that will detect possible performance impacts early on.

The new Object Summary Dashboard in Operations Console provides an overview of your Swift environment.

Important
Important

If Swift is not installed and configured, you will not be able to access this dashboard. The Swift endpoint must be present in Keystone for the Object Summary to be present in the menu.

In Operations Console's object storage dashboard, you can easily review the following information:

1.4.1 Performance Summary Edit source

View a comprehensive summary of current performance values.

To access the object storage performance dashboard:

  1. To open Operations Console, in a browser enter either the URL or Virtual IP connected to Operations Console.

    For example:

    https://myardana.test:9095
    https://VIP:9095
  2. On the Home screen, click the menu represented by 3 horizontal lines (Three-Line Icon).

  3. In the menu, click Storage › Object Storage Summary.

Performance data includes:

Healthcheck Latency from Monasca

This latency is the average time it takes for Swift to respond to a healthcheck, or ping, request. The swiftlm-uptime monitor program reports the value. A large difference between average and maximum may indicate a problem with one node.

Operational Latency from Monasca

Operational latency is the average time it takes for Swift to respond to an upload, download, or object delete request. The swiftlm-uptime monitor program reports the value. A large difference between average and maximum may indicate a problem with one node.

Service Availability

This is the availability over the last 24 hours as a percentage.

  • 100% - No outages in the last 24 hours

  • 50% - Swift was unavailable for a total of 12 hours in the last 24-hour period

Graph of Performance Over Time

Create a visual representation of performance data to see when Swift encountered longer-than-normal response times.

To create a graph:

  1. Choose the length of time you want to graph in Date Range. This sets the length of time for the x-axis which counts backwards until it reaches the present time. In the example below, 1 day is selected, and so the x axis shows performance starting from 24 hours ago (-24) until the present time.

  2. Look at the y-axis to understand the range of response times. The first number is the smallest value in the data collected from the backend, and the last number is the longest amount of time it took Swift to respond to a request. In the example below, the shortest time for a response from Swift was 16.1 milliseconds.

  3. Look for spikes which represent longer than normal response times. In the example below, Swift experienced long response times 21 hours ago and again 1 hour ago.

  4. Look for the latency value at the present time. The line running across the x-axis at 16.1 milliseconds shows you what the response time is currently.

1.4.2 Inventory Summary Edit source

Monitor details about all the Swift resources deployed in your cloud.

To access the object storage inventory screen:

  1. To open Operations Console, in a browser enter either the URL or Virtual IP connected to Operations Console.

    For example:

    https://myardana.test:9095
    https://VIP:9095
  2. On the Home screen, click the menu represented by 3 horizontal lines (Three-Line Icon).

  3. In the menu, click Storage › Object Storage Summary.

  4. On the Summary page, click Inventory Summary.

General Swift metrics are available for the following attributes:

  • Time to replicate: The average time in seconds it takes all hosts to complete a replication cycle.

  • Oldest replication: The time in seconds that has elapsed since the object replication process completed its last replication cycle.

  • Async Pending: This is the number of failed requests to add an entry in the container server's database.There is one async queue per Swift disk, and a cron job queries all Swift servers to calculate the total. When an object is uploaded into Swift, and it is successfully stored, a request is sent to the container server to add a new entry for the object in the database. If the container update fails, the request is stored in what Swift calls an Async Pending Queue.

    Important
    Important

    On a public cloud deployment, this value can reach millions. If it continues to grow, it means that the container updates are not keeping up with the requests. It is also normal for it this number to grow if a node hosting the Swift container service is down.

  • Total number of alarms: This number includes all nodes that host Swift services, including proxy, account, container, and object storage services.

  • Total nodes: This number includes all nodes that host Swift services, including proxy, account, container, and object storage services. The number in the colored box represents the number of alarms in that state. The following colors are used to show the most severe alarm triggered on all nodes:

    Green

    Indicates all alarms are in a known and untriggered state. For example, if there are 5 nodes and they are all known with no alarms, you will see the number 5 in the green box, and a zero in all the other colored boxes.

    Yellow

    Indicates that some low or medium alarms have been triggered but no critical or high alarms. For example, if there are 5 nodes, and there are 3 nodes with untriggered alarms and 2 nodes with medium severity alarms, you will see the number 3 in the green box, the number 2 in the yellow box, and zeros in all the other colored boxes.

    Red

    Indicates at least one critical or high severity alarm has been triggered on a node. For example, if there are 5 nodes, and there are 3 nodes with untriggered alarms, 1 node with a low severity, and 1 node with a critical alarm, you will see the number 3 in the green box, the number 1 in the yellow box, the number 1 in the red box,and a zero in the gray box.

    Gray

    Indicates that all alarms on the nodes are unknown. For example, if there are 5 nodes with no data reported, you will see the number 5 in the gray box, and zeros in all the other colored boxes.

  • Cluster breakdown of nodes: In the example screen above, the cluster consists of 2 nodes named SWPAC and SWOBJ. Click a node name to bring up more detailed information about that node.

1.4.3 Capacity Summary Edit source

Use this screen to view the size of the file system space on all nodes and disk drives assigned to Swift. Also shown is the remaining space available and the total size of all file systems used by Swift. Values are given in megabytes (MB).

To access the object storage alarm summary screen:

  1. To open Operations Console, in a browser enter either the URL or Virtual IP connected to Operations Console.

    For example:

    ardana > https://myardana.test:9095
    https://VIP:9095
  2. On the Home screen, click the menu represented by 3 horizontal lines (Three-Line Icon).

  3. In the menu, click Storage › Object Storage Summary.

  4. On the Summary page, click Capacity Summary.

1.4.4 Alarm Summary Edit source

Use this page to quickly see the most recent alarms and triage all alarms related to object storage.

To access the object storage alarm summary screen:

  1. To open Operations Console, in a browser enter either the URL or Virtual IP connected to Operations Console.

    For example:

    ardana > https://myardana.test:9095
    https://VIP:9095
  2. On the Home screen, click the menu represented by 3 horizontal lines (Three-Line Icon).

  3. In the menu, click Storage › Object Storage Summary.

  4. On the Summary page, click Alarm Summary.

Each row has a checkbox to allow you to select multiple alarms and set the same condition on them.

The State column displays a graphical indicator representing the state of each alarm:

  • Green indicator: OK. Good operating state.

  • Yellow indicator: Warning. Low severity, not requiring immediate action.

  • Red indicator: Alarm. Varying severity levels and must be addressed.

  • Gray indicator: Undetermined.

The Alarm column identifies the alarm by the name it was given when it was originally created.

The Last Check column displays the date and time the most recent occurrence of the alarm.

The Dimension column describes the components to check in order to clear the alarm.

The last column, depicted by three dots, reveals an Actions menu that allows you to choose:

  • View Details, which opens a separate window that shows all the information from the table view and the alarm history.

    Comments can be updated by clicking Update Comment. Click View Alarm Definition to go to the Alarm Definition tab showing that specific alarm definition.

1.5 Visualizing Data in Charts Edit source

Operations Console allows you to create a new chart and select the time range and the metric you want to chart, based on Monasca metrics.

Present data in a pictorial or graphical format to enable administrators and decision makers to grasp difficult concepts or identify new patterns.

Create new time-series graphs from My Dashboard.

My Dashboard also allows you to customize the view in the following ways:

  • Include alarm cards from the Central Dashboard

  • Customize graphs in new ways

  • Reorder items using drag and drop

Plan for future storage

  • Track capacity over time to predict with some degree of reliability the amount of additional storage needed.

Charts and graphs provide a quick way to visualize large amounts of complex data. It is especially useful when trying to find relationships and understand your data, which could include thousands or even millions of variables. You can create a new chart in Operations Console from My Dashboard.

The charts in Operations Console are based on Monasca data. When you create a new chart you will be able to select the time range and the metric you want to chart. The list of Metrics you can choose from is equivalent to using the monasca metric-name-list on the command line. After you select a metric, you can then specify a dimension, which is derived from the monasca metric-list –name <metric_name> command line results. The dimension list changes based on the selected metric.

This topic provides instructions on how to create a basic chart, and how to create a chart specifically to visualize your Cinder capacity.

1.5.1 Create a Chart Edit source

Create a chart to visually display data for up to 6 metrics over a period of time.

To create a chart:

  1. To open Operations Console, in a browser, enter either the URL or Virtual IP connected to Operations Console.

    For example:

    https://myardana.test:9095
    https://VIP:9095
  2. On the Home screen, click the menu represented by 3 horizontal lines (Three-Line Icon).

  3. From the menu that slides in on the left, select Home, and then select My Dashboard.

  4. On the My Dashboard screen, select Create New Chart.

  5. On the Add New Time Series Chart screen, in Chart Definition complete any of the optional fields:

    Name

    Short description of chart.

    Time Range

    Specifies the interval between metric collection. The default is 1 hour. Can be set to hours (1,2,4,8,24) or days (7,30,45).

    Chart Update Rate

    Collects metric data and adds it to the chart at the specified interval. The default is 1 minute. Can be set to minutes (1,5,10,30) or 1 hour.

    Chart Type

    Determines how the data is displayed. The default type is Line. Can be set to the following values:

    • Line

    • Bar

    • Stacked Bar

    • Area

    • Stacked Area

    Chart Size

    This controls the visual display of the chart width as it appears on My Dashboard. The default is Small. This field can be set to Small to display it at 50% or Large for 100%.

  6. On the Add New Time Series Chart screen, in Added Chart Data complete the following fields:

    Metric

    In Monasca, a metric is a multi-dimensional description that consists of the following fields: name, dimensions, timestamp, value and value_meta. The pre-populated list is equivalent to using the monasca metric-name-list on the command line.

    Dimension

    The set of unique dimensions that are defined for a specific metric. Dimensions are a dictionary of key-value pairs. This pre-populated list is equivalent to using the monasca metric-list –name <metric_name> on the command line.

    Function

    Operations Console uses Monasca to provide the results of all mathematical functions. Monasca in turns uses Graphite to perform the mathematical calculations and return the results. The default is AVG. The Function field can be set to AVG (default), MIN, MAX. and COUNT. For more information on these functions, see the Graphite documentation at http://www.aosabook.org/en/graphite.html.

  7. Click Add Data To Chart. To add another metric to the chart, repeat the previous step until all metrics are added. The maximum you can have in one chart is 6 metrics.

  8. To create the chart, click Create New Chart.

After you click Create New Chart, you will be returned to My Dashboard where the new chart will be shown. From the My Dashboard screen you can use the menu in the top-right corner of the card to delete or edit the chart. You can also select an option to create a comma-delimited file of the data in the chart.

1.5.2 Chart Cinder Capacity Edit source

To visualize the use of storage capacity over time, you can create a chart that graphs the total block storage backend capacity. To find out how much of that total is being used, you can also create a chart that graphs the available block storage capacity.

Visualizing Cinder:

Important
Important

The total and free capacity values are based on the available capacity reported by the Cinder backend. Be aware that some backends can be configured to thinly provision.

1.5.3 Chart Total Capacity Edit source

To chart the total block-storage backend capacity:

  1. Log in to Operations Console.

  2. Follow the steps in the previous instructions to start creating a chart.

  3. To chart the total backend capacity, on the Add New Time Series Chart screen, in Chart Definition use the following settings:

    FieldSetting
    Metricscinderlm.cinder.backend.total.size
    Dimension

    any hostname. If multiple backends are available, select any one. The backends will all return the same metric data.

  4. Add the data to the chart and click Create.

Example of a Cinder Total Capacity Chart:

1.5.4 Chart Available Capacity Edit source

To chart the available block-storage backend capacity:

  1. Log in to Operations Console.

  2. Follow the steps in the previous instructions to start creating a chart.

  3. To chart the available backend capacity, on the Add New Time Series Chart screen, in Chart Definition use the following settings:

    FieldSetting
    Metricscinderlm.cinder.backend.total.avail
    Dimension

    any hostname. If multiple backends are available, select any one. The backends will all return the same metric data.

  4. Add the data to the chart and click Create.

Example of a chart showing Cinder Available Capacity:

Important
Important

The source data for the Capacity Summary pages is only refreshed at the top of each hour. This affects the latency of the displayed data on those pages.

1.6 Getting Help with the Operations Console Edit source

On each of the Operations Console pages there is a help menu that you can click on to take you to a help page specific to the console you are currently viewing.

To reach the help page:

  1. Click the help menu option in the upper-right corner of the page, depicted by the question mark seen in the screenshot below.

  2. Click the Get Help For This Page link which will open the help page in a new tab in your browser.

Print this page