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Applies to SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring

1 What is SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring?

As more and more applications are deployed on cloud systems and cloud systems are growing in complexity, managing the cloud infrastructure is becoming increasingly difficult. SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring helps mastering this challenge by providing a sophisticated Monitoring as a Service solution that is operated on top of OpenStack-based cloud computing platforms.

SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring allows enterprises to manage, track, and optimize their cloud infrastructure and the services they provide to end users. It offers a suite of monitoring and analytics tools aimed at improving the health and performance of cloud systems.

SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring assembles and presents metrics and log data in one convenient access point. It offers an integrated view of cloud resources, based on its seamless integration with OpenStack. While being flexible and scalable to instantly reflect changes in the cloud infrastructure of an enterprise, SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring provides the ways and means required to ensure multi-tenancy and data security. The high availability architecture of SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring ensures an optimum level of operational performance eliminating the risk of component failures and providing for reliable crossover.

1.1 Key Features

SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring is an out-of-the-box solution for monitoring OpenStack-based cloud environments. It is provided as a cloud service to users. SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring meets different challenges, ranging from small-scale deployments to high-availability deployments and deployments with high levels of scalability.

The core of SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring is Monasca, an open source Monitoring as a Service solution that integrates with OpenStack. The key features of SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring form an integral part of the Monasca project. SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring extends the source code base of the project through active contributions.

Compared to the Monasca community edition, SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring provides the following added value:

  • Packaging as a commercial enterprise solution

  • Enterprise-level support

The key features of SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring address public as well as private cloud service providers. They include:

  • Monitoring

  • Log management

  • Integration with OpenStack

Monitoring

SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring is a highly scalable and fault tolerant monitoring solution for OpenStack-based cloud infrastructures.

The system operator of the cloud infrastructure and the service providers do not have to care for system monitoring software any longer. They use SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring to check whether their services and servers are working appropriately.

SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring provides comprehensive and configurable metrics with reasonable defaults for monitoring the status, capacity, throughput, and latency of cloud systems. SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring users can set their own warnings and critical thresholds and can combine multiple warnings and thresholds to support the processing of complex events. Combined with a notification system, these alerting features enable them to quickly analyze and resolve problems in the cloud infrastructure.

For details, refer to Chapter 2, Monitoring.

Log Management

With the increasing complexity of cloud infrastructures, it is becoming more and more difficult and time-consuming for the system operator to gather, store, and query the large amounts of log data manually. To cope with these problems, SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring provides centralized log management features.

SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring collects log data from all services and servers the cloud infrastructure is composed of. The log data from a large number of sources can be accessed from a single dashboard. Integrated search, filter, and graphics options enable system operators to isolate problems and narrow down potential root causes. SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring thus provides valuable insights into the log data, even with large amounts of data resulting from highly complex environments.

Based on SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring's alerting features and notification system, users can also configure warnings and critical thresholds for log data. If the number of critical log entries reaches a defined threshold, the users receive a warning and can instantly analyze their logs and start troubleshooting.

For details, refer to Chapter 3, Log Management.

Integration with OpenStack

SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring is integrated with OpenStack core services. These include:

  • OpenStack Horizon dashboard for visualizing monitoring metrics and log data

  • OpenStack user management

  • OpenStack security and access control

1.2 Components

The following illustration provides an overview of the main components of SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring:

structure_new.png
OpenStack

SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring relies on OpenStack as technology for building cloud computing platforms for public and private clouds. OpenStack consists of a series of interrelated projects delivering various components for a cloud infrastructure solution and allowing for the deployment and management of Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) platforms.

For details on OpenStack, refer to the OpenStack documentation (http://docs.openstack.org/).

Monitoring Service

The Monitoring Service is the central SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring component. It is responsible for receiving, persisting, and processing metrics and log data, as well as providing the data to the users.

The Monitoring Service relies on Monasca. It uses Monasca for high-speed metrics querying and integrates the streaming alarm engine and the notification engine of Monasca. For details, refer to the Monasca Wiki (https://wiki.openstack.org/wiki/Monasca).

Horizon Plugin

SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring comes with a plugin for the OpenStack Horizon dashboard. The Horizon plugin extends the main dashboard in OpenStack with a view for monitoring. This enables SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring users to access the monitoring and log management functions from a central Web-based graphical user interface. Metrics and log data are visualized on a comfortable and easy-to-use dashboard.

For details, refer to the OpenStack Horizon documentation (http://docs.openstack.org/developer/horizon/).

Metrics Agent

A Metrics Agent is required for retrieving metrics data from the host on which it runs and sending the metrics data to the Monitoring Service. The agent supports metrics from a variety of sources as well as a number of built-in system and service checks.

A Metrics Agent can be installed on each virtual or physical server to be monitored.

The agent functionality is fully integrated into the source code base of the Monasca project. For details, refer to the Monasca Wiki (https://wiki.openstack.org/wiki/Monasca).

Log Agent

A Log Agent is needed for collecting log data from the host on which it runs and forwarding the log data to the Monitoring Service for further processing. It can be installed on each virtual or physical server from which log data is to be retrieved.

The agent functionality is fully integrated into the source code base of the Monasca project. For details, refer to the Monasca Wiki (https://wiki.openstack.org/wiki/Monasca).

1.3 Users and Roles

SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring users can be grouped by their role. The following user roles are distinguished:

  • An application operator acts as a service provider in the OpenStack environment. He books virtual machines in OpenStack to provide services to end users or to host services that he needs for his own development activities. SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring helps application operators to ensure the quality of their services in the cloud.

  • The OpenStack operator is a special application operator. He is responsible for administrating and maintaining the underlying OpenStack platform and ensures the availability and quality of the OpenStack services (e.g. Heat, Nova, Cinder, Swift, Glance, or Keystone).

    For details on the tasks of the OpenStack operator, refer to the OpenStack Operator's Guide.

  • The Monitoring Service operator is responsible for administrating and maintaining SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring. He provides the cloud monitoring services to the other users and ensures the quality of the Monitoring Service.

    For details on the tasks of the Monitoring Service operator, refer to the Monitoring Service Operator's Guide.

The tasks of the Monitoring Service operator and the OpenStack Operator can jointly be performed by one system operator. In this case, refer to the Monitoring Service Operator's Guide and the OpenStack Operator's Guide.

User Management

SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring is fully integrated with Keystone, the identity service which serves as the common authentication and authorization system in OpenStack.

The SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring integration with Keystone requires any SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring user to be registered as an OpenStack user. All authentication and authorization in SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring is done through Keystone. If a user requests monitoring data, for example, SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring verifies that the user is a valid user in OpenStack and allowed to access the requested metrics.

SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring users are created and administrated in OpenStack:

  • Each user assumes a role in OpenStack to perform a specific set of operations. The OpenStack role specifies a set of rights and privileges.

  • Each user is assigned to at least one project in OpenStack. A project is an organizational unit that defines a set of resources which can be accessed by the assigned users.

    Application operators in SUSE OpenStack Cloud Monitoring can monitor the set of resources that is defined for the projects to which they are assigned.

For details on user management, refer to the OpenStack documentation (http://docs.openstack.org/).

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