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ContentsContents
Virtualization Guide
  1. Preface
  2. I Introduction
    1. 1 Virtualization technology
    2. 2 Virtualization scenarios
    3. 3 Introduction to Xen virtualization
    4. 4 Introduction to KVM virtualization
    5. 5 Virtualization tools
    6. 6 Installation of virtualization components
    7. 7 Virtualization limits and support
  3. II Managing virtual machines with libvirt
    1. 8 Starting and stopping libvirtd
    2. 9 Preparing the VM Host Server
    3. 10 Guest installation
    4. 11 Basic VM Guest management
    5. 12 Connecting and authorizing
    6. 13 Advanced storage topics
    7. 14 Configuring virtual machines with Virtual Machine Manager
    8. 15 Configuring virtual machines with virsh
    9. 16 Managing virtual machines with Vagrant
    10. 17 Xen to KVM migration guide
  4. III Hypervisor-independent features
    1. 18 Disk cache modes
    2. 19 VM Guest clock settings
    3. 20 libguestfs
    4. 21 QEMU guest agent
    5. 22 Software TPM emulator
  5. IV Managing virtual machines with Xen
    1. 23 Setting up a virtual machine host
    2. 24 Virtual networking
    3. 25 Managing a virtualization environment
    4. 26 Block devices in Xen
    5. 27 Virtualization: configuration options and settings
    6. 28 Administrative tasks
    7. 29 XenStore: configuration database shared between domains
    8. 30 Xen as a high-availability virtualization host
    9. 31 Xen: converting a paravirtual (PV) guest into a fully virtual (FV/HVM) guest
  6. V Managing virtual machines with QEMU
    1. 32 QEMU overview
    2. 33 Setting up a KVM VM Host Server
    3. 34 Guest installation
    4. 35 Running virtual machines with qemu-system-ARCH
    5. 36 Virtual machine administration using QEMU monitor
  7. Glossary
  8. A Virtual machine drivers
  9. B Configuring GPU Pass-Through for NVIDIA cards
  10. C XM, XL toolstacks, and the libvirt framework
  11. D GNU licenses
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Applies to SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 15 SP3

A Virtual machine drivers Edit source

Virtualization allows the consolidation of workloads on newer, more powerful, energy-efficient hardware. Paravirtualized operating systems such as SUSE® Linux Enterprise Server and other Linux distributions are aware of the underlying virtualization platform, and can therefore interact efficiently with it. Unmodified operating systems such as Microsoft Windows* are unaware of the virtualization platform and expect to interact directly with the hardware. Because this is not possible when consolidating servers, the hardware must be emulated for the operating system. Emulation can be slow, but it is especially troubling for high-throughput disk and network subsystems. Most performance loss occurs in this area.

The SUSE Linux Enterprise Virtual Machine Driver Pack (VMDP) contains 32-bit and 64-bit paravirtualized network, bus and block drivers for several Microsoft Windows operating systems. These drivers bring many of the performance advantages of paravirtualized operating systems to unmodified operating systems: Only the paravirtualized device driver (not the rest of the operating system) is aware of the virtualization platform. For example, a paravirtualized disk device driver appears as a normal, physical disk to the operating system. However, the device driver interacts directly with the virtualization platform (with no emulation). This helps to efficiently deliver disk access, allowing the disk and network subsystems to operate at near native speeds in a virtualized environment, without requiring changes to existing operating systems.

The SUSE® Linux Enterprise Virtual Machine Driver Pack is available as an add-on product for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server. For detailed information refer to https://www.suse.com/products/vmdriverpack/.

For more information, refer to the Official VMDP Installation Guide .

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