Jump to contentJump to page navigation: previous page [access key p]/next page [access key n]
Applies to SUSE OpenStack Cloud 9

3 Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI User Guide Edit source

The Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI is a web-based GUI for viewing and managing the configuration of an installed cloud. After successfully deploying the cloud with the Install UI, the final screen displays a link to the CLM Admin UI. (For example, see Book “Deployment Guide using Cloud Lifecycle Manager”, Chapter 21 “Installing with the Install UI”, Section 21.5 “Running the Install UI”, Cloud Deployment Successful). Usually the URL associated with this link is https://DEPLOYER_MGMT_NET_IP:9085, although it may be different depending on the cloud configuration and the installed version of SUSE OpenStack Cloud.

3.1 Accessing the Admin UI Edit source

In a browser, go to https://DEPLOYER_MGMT_NET_IP:9085.

The DEPLOYER_MGMT_NET_IP:PORT_NUMBER is not necessarily the same for all installations, and can be displayed with the following command:

ardana > openstack endpoint list --service ardana --interface admin -c URL

Accessing the Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI requires access to the MANAGEMENT network that was configured when the Cloud was deployed. Access to this network is necessary to be able to access the Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI and log in. Depending on the network setup, it may be necessary to use an SSH tunnel similar to what is recommended in Book “Deployment Guide using Cloud Lifecycle Manager”, Chapter 21 “Installing with the Install UI”, Section 21.5 “Running the Install UI”. The Admin UI requires keystone and HAProxy to be running and to be accesible. If keystone or HAProxy are not running, cloud reconfiguration is limited to the command line.

Logging in requires a keystone user. If the user is not an admin on the default domain and one or more projects, the Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI will not display information about the Cloud and may present errors.

Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI Login Page
Figure 3.1: Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI Login Page

3.2 Admin UI Pages Edit source

3.2.1 Services Edit source

Services pages relay information about the various OpenStack and other services that have been deployed as part of the cloud. Service information displays the list of services registered with keystone and the endpoints associated with those services. The information is equivalent to running the command openstack endpoint list.

The Service Information table contains the following information, based on how the service is registered with keystone:

Name

The name of the service, this may be an OpenStack code name

Description

Service description, for some services this is a repeat of the name

Endpoints

Services typically have 1 or more endpoints that are accessible to make API calls. The most common configuration is for a service to have Admin, Public, and Internal endpoints, with each intended for access by consumers corresponding to the type of endpoint.

Region

Service endpoints are part of a region. In multi-region clouds, some services will have endpoints in multiple regions.

Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI Service Information
Figure 3.2: Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI Service Information

3.2.2 Packages Edit source

The Packages tab displays packages that are part of the SUSE OpenStack Cloud product.

The SUSE Cloud Packages table contains the following:

Name

The name of the SUSE Cloud package

Version

The version of the package which is installed in the Cloud

Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI SUSE Cloud Package
Figure 3.3: Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI SUSE Cloud Package
Note
Note

Packages with the venv- prefix denote the version of the specific OpenStack package that is deployed. The release name can be determined from the OpenStack Releases page.

3.2.3 Configuration Edit source

The Configuration tab displays services that are deployed in the cloud and the configuration files associated with those services. Services may be reconfigured by editing the .j2 files listed and clicking the Update button.

This page also provides the ability to set up SUSE Enterprise Storage Integration after initial deployment.

Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI SUSE Service Configuration
Figure 3.4: Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI SUSE Service Configuration

Clicking one of the listed configuration files opens the file editor where changes can be made. Asterisks identify files that have been edited but have not had their updates applied to the cloud.

Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI SUSE Service Configuration Editor
Figure 3.5: Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI SUSE Service Configuration Editor

After editing the service configuration, click the Update button to begin deploying configuration changes to the cloud. The status of those changes will be streamed to the UI.

Configure SUSE Enterprise Storage After Initial Deployment

A link to the settings.yml file is available under the ses selection on the Configuration tab.

To set up SUSE Enterprise Storage Integration:

  1. Click on the link to edit the settings.yml file.

  2. Uncomment the ses_config_path parameter, specify the location on the deployer host containing the ses_config.yml file, and save the settings.yml file.

  3. If the ses_config.yml file does not yet exist in that location on the deployer host, a new link will appear for uploading a file from your local workstation.

  4. When ses_config.yml is present on the deployer host, it will appear in the ses section of the Configuration tab and can be edited directly there.

Note
Note

If the cloud is configured using self-signed certificates, the streaming status updates (including the log) may be interupted and require a reload of the CLM Admin UI. See Book “Security Guide”, Chapter 8 “Transport Layer Security (TLS) Overview”, Section 8.2 “TLS Configuration” for details on using signed certificates.

Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI SUSE Service Configuration Update
Figure 3.6: Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI SUSE Service Configuration Update

3.2.4 Model Edit source

The Model tab displays input models that are deployed in the cloud and the associated model files. The model files listed can be modified.

Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI SUSE Service Model
Figure 3.7: Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI SUSE Service Model

Clicking one of the listed model files opens the file editor where changes can be made. Asterisks identify files that have been edited but have not had their updates applied to the cloud.

Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI SUSE Service Model Editor
Figure 3.8: Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI SUSE Service Model Editor

After editing the model file, click the Validate button to validate changes. If validation is successful, Update is enabled. Click the Update button to deploy the changes to the cloud. Before starting deployment, a confirmation dialog shows the choices of only running config-processor-run.yml and ready-deployment.yml playbooks or running a full deployment. It also indicates the risk of updating the deployed cloud.

Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI SUSE Service Model Confirmation
Figure 3.9: Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI SUSE Service Model Confirmation

Click Update to start deployment. The status of the changes will be streamed to the UI.

Note
Note

If the cloud is configured using self-signed certificates, the streaming status updates (including the log) may be interrupted. The CLM Admin UI must be reloaded. See Book “Security Guide”, Chapter 8 “Transport Layer Security (TLS) Overview”, Section 8.2 “TLS Configuration” for details on using signed certificates.

Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI SUSE Service Model Update
Figure 3.10: Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI SUSE Service Model Update

3.2.5 Roles Edit source

The Services Per Role tab displays the list of all roles that have been defined in the Cloud Lifecycle Manager input model, the list of servers that role, and the services installed on those servers.

The Services Per Role table contains the following:

Role

The name of the role in the data model. In the included data model templates, these names are descriptive, such as MTRMON-ROLE for a metering and monitoring server. There is no strict constraint on role names and they may have been altered at install time.

Servers

The model IDs for the servers that have been assigned this role. This does not necessarily correspond to any DNS or other naming labels a host has, unless the host ID was set that way during install.

Services

A list of OpenStack and other Cloud related services that comprise this role. Servers that have been assigned this role will have these services installed and enabled.

Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI Services Per Role
Figure 3.11: Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI Services Per Role

3.2.6 Servers Edit source

The Servers pages contain information about the hardware that comprises the cloud, including the configuration of the servers, and the ability to add new compute nodes to the cloud.

The Servers table contains the following information:

ID

This is the ID of the server in the data model. This does not necessarily correspond to any DNS or other naming labels a host has, unless the host ID was set that way during install.

IP Address

The management network IP address of the server

Server Group

The server group which this server is assigned to

NIC Mapping

The NIC mapping that describes the PCI slot addresses for the servers ethernet adapters

Mac Address

The hardware address of the servers primary physical ethernet adapter

Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI Server Summary
Figure 3.12: Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI Server Summary

3.2.7 Admin UI Server Details Edit source

Server Details can be viewed by clicking the menu at the right side of each row in the Servers table, the server details dialog contains the information from the Servers table and the following additional fields:

IPMI IP Address

The IPMI network address, this may be empty if the server was provisioned prior to being added to the Cloud

IPMI Username

The username that was specified for IPMI access

IPMI Password

This is obscured in the readonly dialog, but is editable when adding a new server

Network Interfaces

The network interfaces configured on the server

Filesystem Utilization

Filesystem usage (percentage of filesystem in use). Only available if monasca is in use

Server Details (1/2)
Figure 3.13: Server Details (1/2)
Server Details (2/2)
Figure 3.14: Server Details (2/2)

3.3 Topology Edit source

The topology section of the Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI displays an overview of how the Cloud is configured. Each section of the topology represents some facet of the Cloud configuration and provides a visual layout of the way components are associated with each other. Many of the components in the topology are linked to each other, and can be navigated between by clicking on any component that appears as a hyperlink.

3.3.1 Control Planes Edit source

The Control Planes tab displays control planes and availability zones within the Cloud.

Each control plane is show as a table of clusters, resources, and load balancers (represented by vertical columns in the table).

Control Plane

A set of servers dedicated to running the infrastructure of the Cloud. Many Cloud configurations will have only a single control plane.

Clusters

A set of one or more servers hosting a particular set of services, tied to the role that has been assigned to that server. Clusters are generally differentiated from Resources in that they are fixed size groups of servers that do not grow as the Cloud grows.

Resources

Servers hosting the scalable parts of the Cloud, such as Compute Hosts that host VMs, or swift servers for object storage. These will vary in number with the size and scale of the Cloud and can generally be increased after the initial Cloud deployment.

Load Balancers

Servers that distribute API calls across servers hosting the called services.

Control Plane Topology
Figure 3.15: Control Plane Topology
Availability Zones

Listed beneath the running services, groups together in a row the hosts in a particular availability zone for a particular cluster or resource type (the rows are AZs, the columns are clusters/resources)

Control Plane Topology - Availability Zones
Figure 3.16: Control Plane Topology - Availability Zones

3.3.2 Regions Edit source

Displays the distribution of control plane services across regions. Clouds that have only a single region will list all services in the same cell.

Control Planes

The group of services that run the Cloud infrastructure

Region

Each region will be represented by a column with the region name as the column header. The list of services that are running in that region will be in that column, with each row corresponding to a particular control plane.

Regions Topology
Figure 3.17: Regions Topology

3.3.3 Services Edit source

A list of services running in the Cloud, organized by the type (class) of service. Each service is then listed along with the control planes that the service is part of, the other services that each particular service consumes (requires), and the endpoints of the service, if the service exposes an API.

Class

A category of like services, such as "security" or "operations". Multiple services may belong to the same category.

Description

A short description of the service, typically sourced from the service itself

Service

The name of the service. For OpenStack services, this is the project codename, such as nova for virtual machine provisioning. Clicking a service will navigate to the section of this page with details for that particular service.

Services Topology
Figure 3.18: Services Topology

The detail data about a service provides additional insight into the service, such as what other services are required to run a service, and what network protocols can be used to access the service

Components

Each service is made up of one or more components, which are listed separately here. The components of a service may represent pieces of the service that run on different hosts, provide distinct functionality, or modularize business logic.

Control Planes

A service may be running in multiple control planes. Each control plane that a service is running in will be listed here.

Consumes

Other services required for this service to operate correctly.

Endpoints

How a service can be accessed, typically a REST API, though other network protocols may be listed here. Services that do not expose an API or have any sort of external access will not list any entries here.

Service Details Topology
Figure 3.19: Service Details Topology

3.3.4 Networks Edit source

Lists the networks and network groups that comprise the Cloud. Each network group is respresented by a row in the table, with columns identifying which networks are used by the intersection of the group (row) and cluster/resource (column).

Group

The network group

Clusters

A set of one or more servers hosting a particular set of services, tied to the role that has been assigned to that server. Clusters are generally differentiated from Resources in that they are fixed size groups of servers that do not grow as the Cloud grows.

Resources

Servers hosting the scalable parts of the Cloud, such as Compute Hosts that host VMs, or swift servers for object storage. These will vary in number with the size and scale of the Cloud and can generally be increased after the initial Cloud deployment.

Cells in the middle of the table represent the network that is running on the resource/cluster represented by that column and is part of the network group identified in the leftmost column of the same row.

Networks Topology
Figure 3.20: Networks Topology

Each network group is listed along with the servers and interfaces that comprise the network group.

Network Group

The elements that make up the network group, whose name is listed above the table

Networks

Networks that are part of the specified network group

Address

IP address of the corresponding server

Server

Server name of the server that is part of this network. Clicking on a server will load the server topology details.

Interface Model

The particular combination of hardware address and bonding that tie this server to the specified network group. Clicking on an Interface Model will load the corresponding section of the Roles page.

Network Groups Topology
Figure 3.21: Network Groups Topology

3.3.5 Servers Edit source

A hierarchical display of the tree of Server Groups. Groups will be represented by a heading with their name, starting with the first row which contains the Cloud-wide server group (often called CLOUD). Within each Server Group, the Network Groups, Networks, Servers, and Server Roles are broken down. Note that server groups can be nested, producing a tree-like structure of groups.

Network Groups

The network groups that are part of this server group.

Networks

The network that is part of the server group and corresponds to the network group in the same row.

Server Roles

The model defined role that was applied to the server, made up of a combination of services, and network/storage configurations unique to that role within the Cloud

Servers

The servers that have the role defined in their row and are part of the network group represented by the column the server is in.

Server Groups Topology
Figure 3.22: Server Groups Topology

3.3.6 Roles Edit source

The list of server roles that define the server configurations for the Cloud. Each server role consists of several configurations. In this topology the focus is on the Disk Models and Network Interface Models that are applied to the servers with that role.

Server Role

The name of the role, as it is defined in the model

Disk Model

The name of the disk model

Volume Group

Name of the volume group

Mount

Name of the volume being mounted on the server

Size

The size of the volume as a percentage of physical disk space

FS Type

Filesystem type

Options

Optional flags applied when mounting the volume

PVol(s)

The physical address to the storage used for this volume group

Interface Model

The name of the interface model

Network Group

The name of the network group. Clicking on a Network Group will load the details of that group on the Networks page.

Interface/Options

Includes logical network name, such as hed1, hed2, and bond information grouping the logical network name together. The Cloud software will map these to physical devices.

Roles Topology
Figure 3.23: Roles Topology

3.4 Server Management Edit source

3.4.1 Adding Servers Edit source

The Add Server page in the Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI allows for adding additional Compute Nodes to the Cloud.

Add Server Overview
Figure 3.24: Add Server Overview

3.4.1.1 Available Servers Edit source

Servers that can be added to the Cloud are shown on the left side of the Add Server screen. Additional servers can be included in this list three different ways:

  1. Discover servers via SUSE Manager or HPE OneView (for details on adding servers via autodiscovery, see Book “Deployment Guide using Cloud Lifecycle Manager”, Chapter 21 “Installing with the Install UI”, Section 21.4 “Optional: Importing Certificates for SUSE Manager and HPE OneView” and Book “Deployment Guide using Cloud Lifecycle Manager”, Chapter 21 “Installing with the Install UI”, Section 21.5 “Running the Install UI”

  2. Manually add servers individually by clicking Manual Entry and filling out the form with the server information (instructions below)

  3. Create a CSV file of the servers to be added (see Book “Deployment Guide using Cloud Lifecycle Manager”, Chapter 21 “Installing with the Install UI”, Section 21.3 “Optional: Creating a CSV File to Import Server Data”)

Manually adding a server requires the following fields:

ID

A unique name for the server

IP Address

The IP address that the server has, or will have, in the Cloud

Server Group

Which server group the server will belong to. The IP address must be compatible with the selected Server Group. If the required Server Group is not present, it can be created

NIC Mapping

The NIC to PCI address mapping for the server being added to the Cloud. If the required NIC mapping is not present, it can be created

Role

Which compute role to add the server to. If this is set, the server will be immediately assigned that role on the right side of the page. If it is not set, the server will be added to the left side panel of available servers

Some additional fields must be set if the server is not already provisioned with an OS, or if a new OS install is desired for the server. These fields are not required if an OpenStack Cloud compatible OS is already installed:

MAC Address

The MAC address of the IPMI network card of the server

IPMI IP Address

The IPMI network address (IP address) of the server

IPMI Username

Username to log in to IPMI on the server

IPMI Password

Password to log in to IPMI on the server

Manually Add Server
Figure 3.25: Manually Add Server

Servers in the available list can be dragged to the desired role on the right. Only Compute-related roles will be displayed.

Manually Add Server
Figure 3.26: Manually Add Server

3.4.1.2 Add Server Settings Edit source

There are several settings that apply across all Compute Nodes being added to the Cloud. Beneath the list of nodes, users will find options to control whether existing nodes can be modified, whether the new nodes should have their data disks wiped, and whether to activate the new Compute Nodes as part of the update process.

Safe Mode

Prevents modification of existing Compute Nodes. Can be unchecked to allow modifications. Modifying existing Compute Nodes has the potential to disrupt the continuous operation of the Cloud and should be done with caution.

Wipe Data Disks

The data disks on the new server will not be wiped by default, but users can specify to wipe clean the data disks as part of the process of adding the Compute Node(s) to the Cloud.

Activate

Activates the added Compute Node(s) during the process of adding them to the Cloud. Activation adds a Compute Node to the pool of nodes that the nova-scheduler uses when instantiating VMs.

Add Server Settings options
Figure 3.27: Add Server Settings options

3.4.1.3 Install OS Edit source

Servers that have been assigned a role but not yet deployed can have SLES installed as part of the Cloud deployment. This step is necessary for servers that are not provisioned with an OS.

On the Install OS page, the Available Servers list will be populated with servers that have been assigned to a role but not yet deployed to the Cloud. From here, select which servers to install an OS onto and use the arrow controls to move them to the Selected Servers box on the right. After all servers that require an OS to be provisioned have been added to the Selected Servers list and click Next.

Select Servers to Provision OS
Figure 3.28: Select Servers to Provision OS

The UI will prompt for confirmation that the OS should be installed, because provisioning an OS will replace any existing operating system on the server.

Confirm Provision OS
Figure 3.29: Confirm Provision OS

When the OS install begins, progress of the install will be displayed on screen

OS Install Progress
Figure 3.30: OS Install Progress

After OS provisioning is complete, a summary of the provisioned servers will be displayed. Clicking Close will return the user to the role selection page where deployment can continue.

OS Install Summary
Figure 3.31: OS Install Summary

3.4.1.4 Deploy New Servers Edit source

When all newly added servers have an OS provisioned, either via the Install OS process detailed above or having previously been provisioned outside of the Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI, deployment can begin.

The Deploy button will be enabled when one or more new servers have been assigned roles. Clicking Deploy prompt for confirmation before beginning the deployment process

Confirm Deploy Servers
Figure 3.32: Confirm Deploy Servers

The deployment process will begin by running the Configuration Processor in basic validation mode to check the values input for the servers being added. This will check IP addresses, server groups, and NIC mappings for syntax or format errors.

Validate Server Changes
Figure 3.33: Validate Server Changes

After validation is successful, the servers will be prepared for deployment. The preparation consists of running the full Configuration Processor and two additional playbooks to ready servers for deployment.

Prepare Servers
Figure 3.34: Prepare Servers

After the servers have been prepared, deployment can begin. This process will generate a new hosts file, run the site.yml playbook, and update monasca (if monasca is deployed)

Deploy Servers
Figure 3.35: Deploy Servers

When deployment is completed, a summary page will be displayed. Clicking Close will return to the Add Server page.

Deploy Summary
Figure 3.36: Deploy Summary

3.4.2 Activating Servers Edit source

The Server Summary page in the Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI allows for activating Compute Nodes in the Cloud. Compute Nodes may be activated when they are added to the Cloud. An activated compute node is available for the nova-scheduler to use for hosting new VMs that are created. Only servers that are not currently activated will have the activation menu option available.

Activate Server
Figure 3.37: Activate Server

Once activation is triggered, the progress of activating the node and adding it to the nova-scheduler is displayed.

Activate Server Progress
Figure 3.38: Activate Server Progress

3.4.3 Deactivating Servers Edit source

The Server Summary page in the Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI allows for deactivating Compute Nodes in the Cloud. Deactivating a Compute Node removes it from the pool of servers that the nova-scheduler will put VMs on. When a Compute Node is deactivated, the UI attempts to migrate any currently running VMs from that server to an active node.

Deactivate Server
Figure 3.39: Deactivate Server

The deactivation process requires confirmation before proceeding.

Deactivate Server Confirmation
Figure 3.40: Deactivate Server Confirmation

Once deactivation is triggered, the progress of deactivating the node and removing it from the nova-scheduler is displayed.

Deactivate Server Progress
Figure 3.41: Deactivate Server Progress

If a Compute Node selected for deactivation has VMs running on it, a prompt will appear to select where to migrate the running VMs

Select Migration Target
Figure 3.42: Select Migration Target

A summary of the VMs being migrated will be displayed, along with the progress migrating them from the deactivated Compute Node to the target host. Once the migration attempt is complete, click 'Done' to continue the deactivation process.

Deactivate Migration Progress
Figure 3.43: Deactivate Migration Progress

3.4.4 Deleting Servers Edit source

The Server Summary page in the Cloud Lifecycle Manager Admin UI allows for deleting Compute Nodes from the Cloud. Deleting a Compute Node removes it from the cloud. Only Compute Nodes that are deactivated can be deleted.

Delete Server
Figure 3.44: Delete Server

The deletion process requires confirmation before proceeding.

Delete Server Confirmation
Figure 3.45: Delete Server Confirmation

If the Compute Node is not reachable (SSH from the deployer is not possible), a warning will appear, requesting confirmation that the node is shut down or otherwise removed from the environment. Reachable Compute Nodes will be shutdown as part of the deletion process.

Unreachable Delete Confirmation
Figure 3.46: Unreachable Delete Confirmation

The progress of deleting the Compute Node will be displayed, including a streaming log with additional details of the running playbooks.

Delete Server Progress
Figure 3.47: Delete Server Progress

3.5 Server Replacement Edit source

The process of replacing a server is initiated from the Server Summary (see Section 3.2.6, “Servers”). Replacing a server will remove the existing server from the Cloud configuration and install the new server in its place. The rest of this process varies slightly depending on the type of server being replaced.

3.5.1 Control Plane Servers Edit source

Servers that are part of the Control Plane (generally those that are not hosting Compute VMs or ephemeral storage) are replaced "in-place". This means the replacement server has the same IP Address and is expected to have the same NIC Mapping and Server Group as the server being replaced.

To replace a Control Plane server, click the menu to the right of the server listing on the Summary tab of the Section 3.2.6, “Servers” page. From the menu options, select Replace.

Replace Server Menu
Figure 3.48: Replace Server Menu

Selecting Replace will open a dialog box that includes information about the server being replaced, as well as a form for inputting the required information for the new server.

Replace Controller Form
Figure 3.49: Replace Controller Form

The IPMI information for the new server is required to perform the replacement process.

MAC Address

The hardware address of the server's primary physical ethernet adapter

IPMI IP Address

The network address for IPMI access to the new server

IPMI Username

The username credential for IPMI access to the new server

IPMI Password

The password associated with the IPMI Username on the new server

To use a server that has already been discovered, check the box for Use available servers and select an existing server from the Available Servers dropdown. This will automatically populate the server information fields above with the information previously entered/discovered for the specified server.

If SLES is not already installed, or to reinstall SLES on the new server, check the box for Install OS. The username will be pre-populated with the username from the Cloud install. Installing the OS requires specifying the password that was used for deploying the cloud so that the replacement process can access the host after the OS is installed.

The data disks on the new server will not be wiped by default, but users can specify to wipe clean the data disks as part of the replacement process.

Once the new server information is set, click the Replace button in the lower right to begin replacement. A list of the replacement process steps will be displayed, and there will be a link at the bottom of the list to show the log file as the changes are made.

Replace Controller Progress
Figure 3.50: Replace Controller Progress

When all of the steps are complete, click Close to return to the Servers page.

3.5.2 Compute Servers Edit source

When servers that host VMs are replaced, the following actions happen:

  1. a new server is added

  2. existing instances are migrated from the existing server to the new server

  3. the existing server is deleted from the model

The new server will not have the same IP Address and may have a different NIC Mapping and Server Group than the server being replaced.

To replace a Compute server, click the menu to the right of the server listing on the Summary tab of the Section 3.2.6, “Servers” page. From the menu options, select Replace.

Replace Compute Menu
Figure 3.51: Replace Compute Menu

Selecting Replace will open a dialog box that includes information about the server being replaced, and a form for inputting the required information for the new server.

If the IP address of the server being replaced cannot be reached by the deployer, a warning will appear to verify that the replacement should continue.

Unreachable Compute Node Warning
Figure 3.52: Unreachable Compute Node Warning
Replace Compute Form
Figure 3.53: Replace Compute Form

Replacing a Compute server involves adding the new server and then performing migration. This requires some new information:

  • an unused IP address

  • a new ID

  • selections for Server Group and NIC Mapping, which do not need to match the original server.

ID

This is the ID of the server in the data model. This does not necessarily correspond to any DNS or other naming labels of a host, unless the host ID was set that way during install.

IP Address

The management network IP address of the server

Server Group

The server group which this server is assigned to. If the required Server Group does not exist, it can be created

NIC Mapping

The NIC mapping that describes the PCI slot addresses for the server's ethernet adapters. If the required NIC mapping does not exist, it can be created

The IPMI information for the new server is also required to perform the replacement process.

Mac Address

The hardware address of the server's primary physical ethernet adapter

IPMI IP Address

The network address for IPMI access to the new server

IPMI Username

The username credential for IPMI access to the new server

IPMI Password

The password associated with the IPMI Username

To use a server that has already been discovered, check the box for Use available servers and select an existing server from the Available Servers dropdown. This will automatically populate the server information fields above with the information previously entered/discovered for the specified server.

If SLES is not already installed, or to reinstall SLES on the new server, check the box for Install OS. The username will be pre-populated with the username from the Cloud install. Installing the OS requires specifying the password that was used for deploying the cloud so that the replacement process can access the host after the OS is installed.

The data disks on the new server will not be wiped by default, but wipe clean can specified for the data disks as part of the replacement process.

When the new server information is set, click the Replace button in the lower right to begin replacement. The configuration processor will be run to validate that the entered information is compatible with the configuration of the Cloud.

When validation has completed, the Compute replacement takes place in several distinct steps, and each will have its own page with a list of process steps displayed. A link at the bottom of the list can show the log file as the changes are made.

  1. Install SLES if that option was selected

    Install SLES on New Compute
    Figure 3.54: Install SLES on New Compute
  2. Commit the changes to the data model and run the configuration processor

    Prepare Compute Server
    Figure 3.55: Prepare Compute Server
  3. Deploy the new server, install services on it, update monasca (if installed), activate the server with nova so that it can host VMs.

    Deploy New Compute Server
    Figure 3.56: Deploy New Compute Server
  4. Disable the existing server. If the existing server is unreachable, there may be warnings about disabling services on that server.

    Host Aggregate Removal Warning
    Figure 3.57: Host Aggregate Removal Warning

    If the existing server is reachable, instances on that server will be migrated to the new server.

    Migrate Instances from Existing Compute Server
    Figure 3.58: Migrate Instances from Existing Compute Server

    If the existing server is not reachable, the migration step will be skipped.

    Disable Existing Compute Server
    Figure 3.59: Disable Existing Compute Server
  5. Remove the existing server from the model and update the cloud configuration. If the server is not reachable, the user is asked to verify that the server is shut down. If server is reachable, the cloud services running on it will be stopped and the server will be shut down as part of the removal from the Cloud.

    Existing Server Shutdown Check
    Figure 3.60: Existing Server Shutdown Check

    Upon verification that the unreachable host is shut down, it will be removed from the data model.

    Existing Server Delete
    Figure 3.61: Existing Server Delete

    After the model has been updated, a summary of the changes will appear. Click Close to return to the server summary screen.

    Compute Replacement Summary
    Figure 3.62: Compute Replacement Summary
Print this page